Monthly Archives: October 2012

Wow. Stephen King’s writing has really had a huge impact on the perspectives and writing styles of his readership. What a legend.

I’m keen to read a Jenny Mounfield book now, too!

The Australian Literature Review

The Ice-cream ManNightfallA Corner of White (The Colours of Madeleine)CarrieSomething RottenThe Dark Tower: Bk. I: GunslingerShades of Grey

For those unfamiliar with your books, how would you describe your fiction?

All over the shop – but most has speculative fiction, and/or psychologically interesting elements.

You have several novels published with small publishers and self-published, What has your experience been like with these methods of publishing? 

My first experience resulted in a book (junior novel) that, while it sold very well, was remaindered after a year so the publisher could focus on picture books. The second fell through the cracks and was remaindered even sooner due to a buy-out by another publisher who wanted to focus on their own titles. My third book experience was much better. Despite slow sales, Ford Street Publishing still has faith in The Ice-Cream Man, for which I’m eternally grateful.

As for self-publishing: I’m still very new to this experience, having only just released my first Kindle e-book—an adult title: The Unforgetting

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Five Kings

I could read my favourite Stephen King books over and over and over again until the end of time. So, one of my reading goals for 2012 was to read 5 Stephen King books I’ve never read before. I’m happy to say that this has been achieved! I read 5 new Kings, and man, it should become an annual policy.

Here’s what I read:

On Writing (1999)

Source: StephenKing.com

It’s great to read about your favourite author. I’ll admit, there were times when the approach of just plonk on paper any random memory in no order and call it a memoir was a tad irritating, but I  still enjoyed reading the bits and bobs that made SK the writer he is today.

The second half of the book that addresses the craft of writing was excellent. Definitely a great read if you are interested in Stephen King and / or the craft of writing.

Verdict – 6/10

Bag of Bones (1998)

Source: StephenKing.com

Bag Of Bones is a great modern gothic story. After the death of his wife, author Mike Noonan returns to their cabin on the lake, ‘Sara Laughs’ and finds himself in the midst of an extraordinary battle between the living, the dead, and one little girl he must protect. I really enjoyed the sensory aspect of this book, which may have been heightened because of the audiobook format. The gothic elements were a wonderful: location, wild weather, supernatural events, the sound of loons crying on the lake. In fact, that phrase ‘a loon cried on the lake’ is repeated so often during tense moments, that every time I heard it a little shiver ran down my back, keeping me on my toes throughout the story.

The novel contains all the makings of a good King: great characters, an interesting plot, a sprinkling of cool genre and literary devices, not to mention the irony of SK having written Bag Of Bones from the perspective of an author way below his calibre = an ‘I-can’t-put-this-down’ type book… my favourite kind. Yes, definately a good read.

7/10.

11.22.63 (2011)

Source: StephenKing.com

If you’ve read my post ‘11.22.63‘, you know I loved this book. Damn it was good. I’d love to read it again next year and see if the second time round is just as good!

8/10

Full Dark, No Stars (2010)

Source: StephenKing.com

Full Dark, No Stars is a collection of short stories that are more like character studies. And, well, they’re quite dark. Ultimately, each story explores the circumstancial and psychological factors that combine to make a ‘normal’ person decide to murder someone else. It was pretty heavy at times, particularly as it focussed on the darker shades of humanity rather than monsters lurking in the closet.

What is also interesting is the response I had as a reader – there were some scenarios in which I identified with the protagonist and was barracking for them as they went on their rampage of revenge. Other scenarios made me feel sick. I imagine this variety of responses evoked by the stories was intentional.

I have to add that there were a couple of moments where the writing felt a bit like fan fiction, but ultimately it was a good collection. I’m glad I read it.

I’d be interested to know what other people thought. 6/10.

Hearts in Atlantis (1999)

Source: StephenKing.com

Hearts in Atlantis is a collection of short stories that follow a loosely connected group of characters beginning in 1960. One character who gets a mention in all stories is Carol Gerber – though she’s never the main protagonist or narrator. I realised at the end that I’d learned more about the journey of Carol’s life then that of any of the others though she is peripheral through much of it. Clever. But Hearts in Atlantis is not primarily about Carol Gerber. The collection is compiled of a series of stories bookended with Bobby Garfield in 1960 as an 11 year old kid, and Bobby returning home in 1999 (incidentally, these stories are a nice little plug for the Dark Tower series). The Vietnam war plays a major role in the stories, as the protagonists continue to battle through life long after the war has ended.

Great read. 7/10

A word on time:  

So, here are the five Kings I read this year. One thing I noticed through all of them is how SK plays with time. ‘Bag of Bones’ deals with historical events that affect the protagonist’s past and present. ‘Hearts in Atlantis’ follows a timestream for a group of people loosely connected and how their lives spin off in different directions like a spinning top. ‘11.22.63’ explores the concept of time travel and changing history, even ‘On Writing’ plays with time in examining some of the building blocks of SK’s life.

What was my favourite new King you ask? The jewel on the King’s crown?

They were all interesting and captivating in their own ways. I really loved Bag of Bones, but 11.22.63 will have to be the number one King that I read this year, mainly for the emotional response I had to the book, it was such a great story.

What do you think?

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